FAQs

Q?

What is your greatest accomplishment?

A.

My family. While we are not perfect it blows me away that a family can be so fun, challenging and rewarding. Raising 6 children and sacrificing your own will for each other is not easy, but represents the most important accomplishment of my life.

Q?

What is the hardest business lesson you have had to learn?

A.

I'm an extremely loyal person by nature. I'm also a mirror. It's in my nature to love the people who act like they love me and hate the people who hate me. I've had to learn that things aren't always what they appear and to trust my instincts. The most painful realizations are discovering that people who helped a project get to where it is can't carry the project to where it needs to go. It can be so tough to let go.

Q?

How did you come up with the idea?

A.

In all my ventures this is the most asked question I get. I've been in those college dorm conversations about how to start a company - and while I'm not sure I understand the question completely my answer is that ideas are happening all the time. Every day new ideas flood in. It is focusing on something so hard that it fills the gaps in between your thoughts. Fills the moments when you are driving, standing in the shower or is there right before you fall asleep. When you are in this state the changes or adjustments you need to try pop into your mind - and if you write them down you have a chance to discover something!

Q?

How did you know what to do?

A.

I didn't - in fact I'm not sure that I know even now. Most of the stuff I've done I've done without prior  experience. Figuring it out has been a process. I've tried to find people who know and ask lots of questions and taking lots of notes. If you can't find these people - go to an industry conference even if it costs $2,000 for a trip and don't be shy. Go meet people and learn from them. Most importantly - keep learning. If you have much success you'll probably start thinking "this isn't that hard"... when you get to that point you are probably about to hit a pretty rough patch.

Q?

How have you financed your companies?

A.

Mostly with TIME. I've been willing to work consistently over an extended period of time without getting paid with the idea that at some point my efforts will have created the ability for me to continue to get paid whether I work or not. Then instead of taking time off I keep working. To be fair I have done my share of jumping from one idea to the next - although not often by choice. The housing market collapse, the saturation of the color run market in the US - have forced me through painful growth opportunities I wouldn't have been man enough to choose unless I was forced to. If you believe in something enough to work at it and invest in it you will quickly find others will join you and if you keep your eyes and ears open before you know it you'll discover some amazing opportunities!

Q?

What are you most cautious of?

A.

Two important fables come to mind: The Emperors New Clothes, and The Golden Goose. I've had people listen to ideas I have and tell me what a genius I am. You'll find no shortage of people willing to take a share of your idea without risking anything... but the second they are forced to put skin in the game they disappear. You'll also find no shortage of people willing to help you spend your gold or try to kill that golden goose to get all the eggs out - and they'll probably blame you when it is dead.

Q?

What are you working on now?

A.

Having had projects be tremendously successful can be a lot of pressure. It is easy to feel like everything I touch has to turn to gold - and I'm convinced this is an easy way to pass up on great opportunities because the story I have to tell won't be sexy enough when people ask what I'm working on. I'm trying not to worry about how much sizzle the story has - and to give myself permission to try stuff that fails without it meaning that I'm a failure. I'm working on the stuff that wakes me up at night or that I can't stop thinking about when I'm in the shower.